Junior dos Santos agrees to random blood draws in his fight against PEDs

Today news surfaced that UFC Heavyweight champion Junior dos Santos has continued his outspoken stance against the use of performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs) in MMA. After going through a veritable circus surrounding the 14:1 T:E levels of his original opponent Alistair Overeem before UFC 146, he subsequently found out that his replacement foe Frank Mir was indeed on Testosterone Replacement Therapy. Mir’s use was regulated and approved of by the commission, and it did not seem to help him, as dos Santos left the event with his first title defense via TKO.

Always focusing on his view that being a clean fighter is the best way, dos Santos agreed to participate in random blood draws to ensure proof of his natural way of fighting. At a recent press conference in Sao Paulo, Brazil, dos Santos said the following regarding the issue:

“I am champion and never have used anything, and I am proud to say that. It is unfair to use substances. With or without authorization, it makes a difference. A fighter who can do this kind of treatment is not himself in the octagon and using tricks to improve his performance.”

The champion joins other high-level fighters such as Mark Munoz and Roy Nelson as anti-TRT, anti-PED proponents. With so many fighters receiving exemptions to use TRT prior to a fight, it now appears there is a group of fighters looking to speak out against this use they view as cheating. News of TRT has been booming around the world of MMA for the last several months, only recently overshadowed by the unprecedented barrage of card-changing injuries. As more and more fighters are found to have used TRT, and more join together to fight this, what will be the end result? Should random drug testing, although costly to the UFC, be implemented? If it is not, will PEDs be the black cloud over MMA that causes a screeching halt to its rapid growth in popularity? The Heavyweight champion has expressed his clear and decisive views, what effect will it have on the plague of drug use within MMA?

Further Reading: Mark Munoz on TRT therapy: It’s cheating


19 Comments

  1. Profile photo of japanegro23

    japanegro23

    June 15, 2012 at 1:33 am

    That is freaking awesome. I love JDS for this. It won’t change a thing but it is great to know we have a champ that doesn’t believe in cutting corners or finding loopholes to gain every advantage possible. I’m sure he works hard and I’m glad he is succeeding. Win or lose, TRT DOES HELP a fighter. Do your own research. It doesn’t guarantee a victory but it helps in numerous ways. I hope they ban the use of it. It would help if Dana was against it but he apparently doesn’t care one way or another as long as it doesn’t mess up a fight card.

  2. Profile photo of ShenronRage

    ShenronRage

    June 15, 2012 at 2:28 am

    Cost value analysis says, that if you allow TRT then you make this sport unfair, dis-balanced, and take a lot of value out of the competition thus no one watches which means no UFC no profit period, or pay for the test and keep the UFC up and running. The choice is clear.

  3. Profile photo of UnderdogGreatness

    UnderdogGreatness

    June 15, 2012 at 2:34 am

    Now, that’s exactly why JDS is definitely my kind of fighter. Unfortunately JDS, not everyone thinks like you do, sad but true.

  4. Profile photo of falcon4917

    falcon4917

    June 15, 2012 at 2:51 am

    Great to see some fighters standing their ground and making other fighters look like posers.

  5. Profile photo of UnderdogGreatness

    UnderdogGreatness

    June 15, 2012 at 3:05 am

    I completely agree, falcon. Unfortunately no matter how often they randomly get tested, some fighters will still continue to find some loopholes. Some people are just cheaters by nature.

  6. Profile photo of KeithFarrell

    KeithFarrell

    June 15, 2012 at 3:06 am

    Junior is the man

  7. Profile photo of JTalbain

    JTalbain

    June 15, 2012 at 3:31 am

    I disagree that they should ban the use of it entirely, because low testosterone is a legitimate medical condition. However, a doctor prescribing enough treatment to boost a fighter’s levels to the point where it would disqualify them (6 to 1 T:E ratio) Is RIDICULOUSLY irresponsible. It’s one thing to replace a hormone they are comng up short in, it’s another to boost it to such levels they have to start worrying about permanent damage to their body.

    Look at Mir. People jump on his case for using TRT, but his T:E ratio afterward was still only 1:1, which is less than the average athlete (1.15:1 ratio) and FAR below that of an elite athlete. His doctor boosted his levels to that of the average joe on the streets, something I’d hardly call trying to gain an advantage. All the same, it shows his doctor was responsible, and the state commission needs to get more like his doctor to handle approved TRT in the future.

  8. Profile photo of jdnextchamp

    jdnextchamp

    June 15, 2012 at 5:20 am

    Being a fighter I would right now go on Fb/Twitter to say I support JDS. I don’t understand why some fighters don’t say a thing about it, it’s weird and suspicious at the same time. Anyways, props to JDS for saying that, it definitely makes him gain fans and that is good for him!

  9. Profile photo of M1_Global_Gangsta

    M1_Global_Gangsta

    June 15, 2012 at 1:06 pm

    JDS is a great champ ! He is following the path of FEDOR EMELIANENKO THE LAST EMPEROR ! All Natural ! Yeah buddy !

  10. Profile photo of enjoylife321

    enjoylife321

    June 15, 2012 at 2:43 pm

    well said..JT

    Consider this, if TRT therapy is banned, you may see alot of fighters already retired like Dan Henderson, Chael Sonnen or Frank Mir.

    The reality is many athletes are using TRT, its medically approved so people need to build a bridge and accept it. If the commissions allow it why is everyone suddenly so concerned.

    TRT therapy is simply removing a disadvantage that fighters may have against fighters with naturally higher testostorone levels. The commissions clearly states the guidelines for levels and those levels are based on the norm of A healthy man. When TRT is given, fighters must be in that range.

    If people are worried about TRT and the effect it might have on their bodies, then they should stop and think about the risks of recieving punches to the head, being knocked unconscious, broken limbs.

  11. Profile photo of cranestyle

    cranestyle

    June 15, 2012 at 4:49 pm

    Kudos to JDS for not just talking the talk, but walking the walk.

    However, I’m not sure the issue is that simple. Is there really any such thing as a completely natural fighter? One of the arguments against TRT is if your testosterone is that low, you shouldn’t be fighting.

    What about knee surgery? In some procedures, they graft tissue from other parts of your body. If you have a hernia, they’ll use a mesh to reinforce the injured tissue.

    Those are both about as unnatural a thing as you can imagine. Would anybody say that if your knee or groin goes, you shouldn’t be fighting?

    I have no problem with a fighter using TRT if they have an actual deficit. I wonder if, 4-5 years from now, when JDS’s testosterone might be getting low, he’ll still feel the same way.

  12. Profile photo of johnedge

    johnedge

    June 15, 2012 at 6:35 pm

    Fedor asked for Alistar Overeem to take this test and EVERYONE freaked out. Fedor was called a COWARD. I guess JDS is a COWARD your eyes.

    Time to start explaining WHY the sudden change in position fellas.

  13. Profile photo of David Saucier

    David Saucier

    June 15, 2012 at 7:49 pm

    So in another words he is ducking Reem lol. I assume anyone who signs up to fight JDS will also have to agree to random blood test.

  14. Profile photo of godsofwararise

    godsofwararise

    June 15, 2012 at 7:58 pm

    So wait, insisting on playing by the rules and not using PEDs equates to ducking someone? Are you off your fvcking medications or something? If Overeem can’t pass a goddamn piss test that’s his problem not JDS’s.

  15. Profile photo of Evan Holober

    Evan Holober

    June 15, 2012 at 11:10 pm

    “Consider this, if TRT therapy is banned, you may see alot of fighters already retired like Dan Henderson, Chael Sonnen or Frank Mir.”

    Yep, but maybe they just simply shouldn’t be competing anymore. If age/cutting weight/whatever has depleted your levels, why should you be able to bring them back up to the normal level of a man half your age?

    “The commissions clearly states the guidelines for levels and those levels are based on the norm of A healthy man. When TRT is given, fighters must be in that range.”

    False. The commission clearly states that any athlete below the levels of 6:1 (6 times that of a normal man) are within legal guidelines. Even with a TRT exemption. They don’t have to stay at the 1:1 levels, and don’t provide blood testing to even check out ng/dl levels.

  16. Profile photo of JTalbain

    JTalbain

    June 16, 2012 at 3:35 am

    In all fairness 6:1 isn’t as ridiculous a limit as it sounds. An Australian study on T:E ratios found that athletes in the 99th percentile were commonly over a 5:1 ratio.

    But you’re kind of right. TRT in sports is a bit like the designated hitter rule in baseball: It’s intended to extend the careers of veterans.

  17. Profile photo of enjoylife321

    enjoylife321

    June 16, 2012 at 4:39 am

    If fighters have low testostorone, then it affects their quality of life, levels of energy.

    The commission does not act independently, it acts on the discretion of medical professionals for the guidelines. Testostorone levels vary between individuals and that is why it is not set at 1.1. Because some people will naturally be above that. You can’t set guidelines that don;t allow degree of variation.

    Is it your argument that you don’t respect the medical fields judgement. Because these are the people who made the recommendation.

  18. Profile photo of enjoylife321

    enjoylife321

    June 16, 2012 at 4:55 am

    When it comes to this debate on TRT, I support the endocrinologist and internal medicine specialist who spent 10 years studying.

    The study you refer to in Australia is why the levels are set where they are set. They have researched this over and over again.

  19. Profile photo of Evan Holober

    Evan Holober

    June 16, 2012 at 5:29 am

    “If fighters have low testostorone, then it affects their quality of life, levels of energy.”

    Yes, the problem is the use might actually be giving them an advantage of having their levels of testosterone be that of their 20 year old peers. Not that of a “normal” 35 and above year old.

    “The commission does not act independently,”

    Again false, they act as an independent body. Their budget makes this a necessity. It acts on the discretion of certain amount of professionals, and routinely ignore the opinions of many others. That is why there is so much debate over procedures the athletic commission use. For instance: Sonnen, Overeem, and Lamont Peterson in boxing had no endocronoligist advise them of TRT use (Overeem was just straight testosterone). It was all advised by doctors in other fields. There was also no endocronoligist present when they interviewed Sonnen either time when he got his exemption.

    “Testostorone levels vary between individuals and that is why it is not set at 1.1.”

    Yes, I never said it wasn’t. I simply made the information present that guys who are on the treatment because their levels are below that in the first place, can legally exceed their levels all the way to 6:1 (as JT pointed out earlier the 99th percentile, and Ive seen studies when its more like 99.9% percentile) without worry.

    “When it comes to this debate on TRT, I support the endocrinologist and internal medicine specialist who spent 10 years studying.”

    If you do than you would be interested to learn that many people from this field feel that the treatment isn’t being used correctly in sports (combat sports especially).

    “In all fairness 6:1 isn’t as ridiculous a limit as it sounds. An Australian study on T:E ratios found that athletes in the 99th percentile were commonly over a 5:1 ratio.”

    “The study you refer to in Australia is why the levels are set where they are set. They have researched this over and over again. “

    I completely understand where both of you are coming from with this. However, what I am saying is that men on treatment because their testosterone levels are too low in the first place should not be able to spike their count up to that of an athlete that is in the 99+ % of all men.

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